Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher in L.A.!!

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Long Beach, CA

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Long Beach, CA

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher in L.A.

Straight-up lifers are becoming hard to come by here in Los Angeles. Trips to SE Arizona, Texas, Costa Rica and Mexico in the last two years mean even delicious vagrants may already be on my life list. Since I mainly bird my 5MR, rather than chase, I don’t mind. But every birder loves a chance at a lifer. And word went out on Wednesday of a Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher in a neighborhood in Long Beach. Our family’s slow emergence from the “quaran-time” meant I was shuttling kids around that afternoon, and couldn’t make the chase. I had to cross my fingers it’d be around the next day

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher is a large flycatcher whose range stretches from Bolivia to Mexico. It’s regularly seen in the U.S. in southeastern Arizona during summer. But there had only been two prior sightings in L.A. County. It’s one of the finds that brings all the bnirds out, not just from L.A. but from all over California. It was seen all day long on Wednesday, until about 4:00pm, when it disappeared into a tree and wasn’t spotted again. Those who saw it were getting good looks. I had time the next morning to join the couple dozen birders who’d surely be there hunting.

With the exception of Costa Rica, when my son and I enjoyed regular 6:00am walks to see birds and mammals, I’ve never been good at getting up at the crack of dawn. It’s rewarding when I do, because the birding really is much, much better. But more often than not, I can’t get myself up and out until around 8am. Maybe part of me doesn’t want to go all-in. I managed a 7:45am departure, just ten minutes after word went out that the bird had been seen already that morning.

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Long Beach, CA

The colors are more striking in real life

When I drove up to the spot, there were 20 birders pointing and taking pictures and staring intently through binoculars. But it was street-sweeping day in the neighborhood, and there weren’t any close spots. So I wandered a couple of blocks, found a spot, a made my way back to the crowd. The mood upon my arrival was post-coital jubilance. No one was staring through binoculars or pointing long lenses at the trees. They’d all just gotten their show, and the bird had vanished into some backyard trees. The group was thick with old-timers, a couple young whipper-snappers, curious neighbors, and Jon Dunn, who I was happy to finally meet.

Within 10 minutes, the large crowd had thinned. It was just me and 3 or 4 others. It was another 30 or 40 minutes of walking up and down the street until I spotted the Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher on a utility wire. A marine layer of low clouds had moved in, making for terrible photos. But I got my document shots. And then I made sure the birders wandering the area knew we had found it. It moved around from tree to tree to wire to tree for about 15 minutes. And then we lost it.

I’m not sure what’s more remarkable – that vagrant birds end up in residential neighborhoods, or that somebody with enough knowledge happens to share the same space and notices an odd sound or sees a strangely colored bird. I’m convinced there’s many out-of-place birds working the trees of our urban areas. Indeed, if Kimball Garrett spent a September at my house, he’d probably pull out three east coast warblers, a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and a lost vireo. They’re there. But most of us aren’t walking our neighborhoods looking for them. Even if we are paying attention, our ID skills simply aren’t good enough.

 

L.A. County Lifer: Stilt Sandpiper

Stilt Sandpipers, L.A. River, Los Angeles, CA

Stilt Sandpipers, L.A. River, Los Angeles, CA

L.A. County Lifer: Stilt Sandpiper

After a Friday night earthquake, I didn’t manage to get up and out for a bird walk this Saturday (though I wasn’t as lazy as my 11-year-old, who slept until 11:30am). Sometimes, a delay turns out to be an advantage. As I was eating breakfast, I checked the L.A. County birds listserv. It’s the time of year when vagrants abound. There was a 20-minute old report of a Stilt Sandpiper on the L.A. River. It was found, of course, by Richard Barth. (Who knows what the twitchers would do if he wasn’t out there hustling all year finding birds for them). I’d only seen Stilt Sandpiper twice, five years ago in Texas. Sensing an easy L.A. County lifer, I grabbed a mask and headed out.

When I arrived at the spot (the L.A. River at Slauson Ave), I was surprised that no one else was there. I double-checked that I had the location right. I did. Along with several hundred gulls, dozens of Black-necked Stilts, some Avocets, and a bunch of Least Sandpipers, I found the target group of dowitchers. But the river is wide, and even walking down to the water’s edge, the birds were far off on the other shore. I didn’t see anything amongst the dowitcher flock, but I did see three birds off to themselves that looked promising. With the report not indicating the number of Stilt Sandpipers seen, I figured they were probably Yellowlegs.

I crossed over the bridge to the other side of the river and scanned the dowitcher flock again. Still nothing. Another birder showed up and agreed there wasn’t a Stilt Sandpiper amongst the dowitchers. I decided to walk a bit upstream. I passed that same group of 3 long-legged sandpipers I’d seen earlier from afar, and gave them a closer look. They all looked pretty similar, and weren’t quite right for Lesser Yellowlegs. The eyebrow (birders say “supercilium”) was prominently white, and the bill was too long. I could convince myself the bill drooped down at the end. But because there were three of them, and not one, and thinking the report was of a single Stilt Sandpiper, I decided to wander a bit further up the river.

I hadn’t walked 20 feet when the other birder called me back. He was looking at the group of 3. We stared through our binoculars. He fired off shots with his mega-lens. We exchanged bird-nerd (“bnird”) references to field marks (“Bnird.com” was my runner-up choice for website name). And we agreed that we were looking at three Stilt Sandpipers. It never feels good to stare at the rare birds and have the guy behind you ID them. But it’s better than misidentifying a regular bird as a rarity.

More From the Week: Pectoral Sandpiper on Ballona Creek

The magic of the barren concrete section of Ballona Creek between Centinela and Inglewood continued this week. One afternoon, I spotted a Pectoral Sandpiper amongst the peeps. It wasn’t my first 5MR Pectoral sighting. A few years back one showed up at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh. But it was a pleasant surprise. They only get reported every 3-4 years on the west side, and only once previously on the Ballona Creek. Maybe a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper will wander into my 5MR before the year is up.

Pectoral Sandpiper, Ballona Creek, CA

Pectoral Sandpiper, Ballona Creek, CA

The birds apparently get their name from a puffed-up chest display they do on the breeding grounds involving an inflatable sac on their chest. There’s a good picture at the bottom of this article about Pectorals on their breeding grounds. 

 

 

Pectoral Sandpiper, Ballona Creek, CA

Showing off those namesake pecs?

Pectoral Sandpiper, Ballona Creek

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